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Ontario Railway Stations

Sarnia

  • Image of railway station

    Great Western Railway (Terminal and Station)

    Thomas Wheatley Studio, ca. 1905

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    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: Valentine & Sons, ca. early 1900s

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    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: Valentine & Sons, ca. 1910

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    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: International Stationery Co.Picton, ca. 1914

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    Canadian National Railway

    Publisher: PECO, ca. 1928

  • Image of railway station

    VIA Rail

    Photo: © Jeri Danyleyko, 2016

  • Image of railway station

    VIA Rail

    Photo: © Jeri Danyleyko, 2015

  • Image of railway station

    VIA Rail

    Photo: © Jeri Danyleyko, 2016

  • Image of railway station

    CSX

    Photo: © Jeri Danyleyko, 2015

  • Image of railway station

    CSX

    Photo: © Jeri Danyleyko, 2016

The first station built in Sarnia was the Great Western in 1858 (shown to the right of the tracks). In 1882 the GWR was taken over by the GTR, which made some use of the terminal (to the left of the tracks) and leased the station to the Detroit River & Lake Erie Railroad (later Pere Marquette).

The VIA station in Sarnia was built in 1891 by the GTR, which shifted its base of operations from Point Edward, about three km northwest. Also known as the "Tunnel Station," it was part of an innovative plan that included the opening of the St. Clair Tunnel which ran under the river to Port Huron, Michigan. The tunnel was electrified in 1908.

According to recent reports, VIA Rail has plans to expand service in the Sarnia area. The station, which is a designated heritage structure, is currently undergoing renovations.

The former CSX station, located at the site of the old GWR yards, was likely built by the Pere Marquette Railroad in the early 1900s. The PM was absorbed into the Chesapeake & Ohio (now CSX) in the 1940s. The building has been extensively renovated and remains in use by CSX, which continues to maintain limited operations in Canada.

Special thanks to the staff at the city of Sarnia and the Sarnia Historical Society for the additional details on the GWR.