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Quebec Railway Stations

Rivière-du-Loup

  • Image of railway station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    William Notman / Library and Archives Canada / PA-194578, ca. 1860

  • Image of railway station

    Temiscouata Railway

    Musée du Bas-Saint-Laurent, Fonds Belle-Lavouie, b0031, ca. early 1900s

  • Image of railway station

    Intercolonial Railway

    Publisher: James Valentine & Sons, ca. 1910

  • Image of railway station

    Intercolonial Railway

    Photo: Stanislas Belle, Fraserville, ca. 1910

  • Image of railway station

    Intercolonial Railway

    Photo: Stanislas Belle, Fraserville, ca. 1910

  • Image of railway station

    Intercolonial Railway

    Publisher: Pruneau & Kirouac, Quebec, ca. 1907

  • Image of railway station

    Canadian National Railway

    ca. 1942

  • Image of railway station

    VIA Rail

    Creative Commons License, ca. 2007

Rivière-du-Loup was founded in 1673. It was known as Fraserville from 1850 until 1919 when it reverted back to its original name. The city was served by two railways for close to 100 years.

The first station was built around 1860 by the Grand Trunk Railway (GTR). That section of the GTR was sold to the government-owned Intercolonial Railway (IRC) in 1879. The transaction was beneficial to both parties. In 1883, the IRC (later CN) replaced the station with an expansive structure topped with a Gambrel roof, typical of the distinctive IRC styling during that period. The second station lasted until the mid 20th century when CN replaced it with a modern structure. It remains in use as a passenger terminal by VIA Rail.

The Temiscouata Railway, which ran between Rivière-du-Loup and Edmundston, New Brunswick, opened in 1889. It lasted until 1949 when it was purchased by CN at the urging of the bondholders, the federal government and local communities along the route. Although passenger service ended in 1954, the Temiscouata continued to serve industrial clients until the late 1980s. It was completely abandoned by 1993.