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Ontario Railway Stations

St. Marys

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    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Source: St. Marys Museum, ca. 1937

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    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Photo: Gord Taylor, ca. 1971

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    Canadian National Railway Former (St. Marys Junction)

    Photographer unknown, ca. 1983

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    Canadian National Railway Former (St. Marys Junction)

    Photo: Gord Taylor, Lakeside ON., ca. 1998

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    Canadian National Railway Former (St. Marys Junction)

    Source: Display material, St. Marys Museum, Jeri Danyleyko, 2016

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    Canadian National Railway Former (St. Marys Junction)

    Photo: © Jeri Danyleyko, 2016

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    Canadian National Railway Former (St. Marys Junction)

    Photo: © Jeri Danyleyko, 2016

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    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: The International Stationery Co., Picton, ca. early 1900s

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    Canadian National Railway

    Publisher: PECO, ca. late 1930s

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    VIA Rail

    Photo: W.H. Coo, JBC Visuals, ca. 1982

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    VIA Rail

    © Jeri Danyleyko, 2016

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    VIA Rail

    © Jeri Danyleyko, 2015

The first station in St. Marys was built in 1858 by Gzowski and Company for the GTR. The land had been purchased from David Glass who was mayor of London at the time. Shortly after the purchase, the GTR gained speedy access to London which was already served by their major rival, the GWR.

Many of the GTR's early problems were tied to cozy political relationships such as this. The Glass land was in an awkward location north of the town site and far from the important commercial areas. The community was angry and bitter towards the railway for many years.

On a brighter note, it is believed Thomas Edison may have worked in the station for a brief period as a telegrapher.

In 1907 the GTR decided to make peace with the local citizenry by building a new station close to the centre of town.

The first station was renamed St. Marys Junction and remained in use by CN until 1941. In 1973 it received historical designation as one of the few surviving stone stations. The second station was similarly honored in 1987, receiving historical designation for its distinctive architecture. The second station continues to function as a railway terminal for VIA Rail.