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canada-rail

Ontario Railway Stations

Guelph

  • Guelph GTR Station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    ca. early 1900s

  • Guelph GTR Station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: International Stationery, Picton, ca. 1912

  • Guelph GTR Station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: International Stationery, Picton, ca. 1914

  • Guelph GTR Station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    Published: Warwick Bros. & Rutter, ca. 1915

  • Guelph GTR Station

    Grand Trunk Railway

    Publisher: Valentine & Son, ca. 1920

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1568, ca. 1905

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Publisher: Rumsey & Company, ca. 1910

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Publisher: Canadian Souvenir Post Card, ca. 1912

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Publisher: Warwick & Rutter for C. Anderson & Co., Guelph, ca. 1912

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Publisher: Valentine & Son, ca. 1913

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    Publisher: International Stationery Company, ca. 1920s

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    ca. 1974

  • Guelph CPR Station

    Canadian Pacific Railway

    ca. 1974

  • Guelph GJR Station

    Guelph Junction Railway (CPR)

    Source: Steve Headford, ca. 1950s

  • Guelph GJR Station

    Guelph Junction Railway (CPR)

    ca. 1950s

  • Guelph GJR Station

    Guelph Junction Railway (CPR)

    ca. 1982

  • Guelph GJR Station

    Guelph Junction Railway (CPR)

    ca. 1983

  • Guelph GJR Station

    Guelph Junction Railway (CPR)

    ca. 1997

Guelph's first station was built in 1855 by the GTR. Following considerable pressure from the community, it was replaced in 1911. Now known as Guelph Central Station, the building remains in use by VIA Rail, GO Transit and Greyhound Canada.

The first Guelph Junction (CPR) station was established in the John Galt home, built in 1827, It was replaced by the CPR, also in 1911. At the CPR's insistence, the old building was removed from the property and then relocated to Riverside Park. There was no funding to maintain the building. Consequently it was badly vandalized and finally demolished in 1926.

The second CPR station was closed in 1960 and used by the Chamber of Commerce for a number of years afterwards. In 1983 it was disassembled and transported to Cambridge (Galt) for reconstruction and future use as a railway museum. The job has never been completed.

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